4 Reasons Why Apple Could Well Go The Way Of BlackBerry

 

My sister thinks that I am almost primitive for not having switched to an iPhone. She was even more surprised when she saw my reluctance to make this switch when she recently bought an iPhone7 for all family members while visiting us recently from the US of A.

Till about a year back I was terribly happy with a BlackBerry (BB), until it became clear that many convenient apps did not make versions compatible with this device. So, I switched to Android. As I mentioned in one of my posts that went viral, BB lost the plot when it failed to take a few significant decisions in its product lifecycle. Even while Apple is likely to be the first company ever to achieve a US$ 1 trillion market cap, its fate might be similar to BB if it doesn’t change course.

If you see someone struggling with a tangle of battery packs and wires, you can bet they are iPhone users.

It’s a given that until recently Apple used to make the most beautiful phones and laptops on the planet and yet a statistic that I came across pleasantly surprised me. Give or take, Apple has less than 20% market share of the smartphone industry but pockets 90% of the entire profits of the smartphones sold across the planet.

And that’s why the smartness and iconic status of Apple in every aspect makes it the most talked about brand in the world.

But here are some buts.

Product efficiency must be far better than the rest of the competition

If you see someone struggling with a tangle of battery packs and wires, you can bet they are iPhone users. It’s hard to imagine that Apple hasn’t been able to get its battery right. And on top of that they aren’t even apologetic about it. If someone was to have a long working day from 5am to midnight, Apple would probably pack up by noon sans assistance. It’s a shame to see iPhone users nervously struggling with chords and chargers. Apple must do something about its batteries or it’s in trouble.

 

For one-sixth the cost of an iPhone, [a] Chinese brand gave me far superior efficiency in terms of interface, battery and response.

Further to substantiate my belief I used a US$200 Chinese phone along with an iPhone7 for a fortnight. For one-sixth the cost of an iPhone, the Chinese brand gave me far superior efficiency in terms of interface, battery and response.

A position of supremacy can neither be taken for granted not can it last forever

A brand like Apple must consolidate its present position and try and capture a much larger market share. Customers are conscious and no brand in this ever more connected and efficient world can charge a 4X premium for just a little more beauty and efficiency.

The saga of success that started in early 2000s, when iPods took over the world, must continue into a new product or invention. For how long can Apple continue to play with just different sizes and shapes of the iPhones? Customers will eventually wise up to the fact that it’s vinegary old wine in a sleek new bottle.

Product evolution in line with customers’ demand/desire

Every other phone comes with a two-SIM slot that is really the most practical functionality to have for people who travel and are sometimes in need of alternate numbers (or simply want to have separate work and personal numbers). Apple has conveniently avoided providing this most desired functionality. If India and China with multiple GSM service providers at multiple GSM frequencies are to be Apple’s next serious countries of growth, it must start providing two-SIM phones sooner rather than later.

A starter two-SIM phone costs as little as US$40, and it’s terribly surprising that Apple hasn’t thought of it as its top priority while singing paeans to its India and China potential.

Greed is good but put a stop somewhere

As Gordon Gekko says – Greed is good and Apple has brilliantly realised its greed to an extent that its cash reserves of US$250 billion are more than the GDP of many countries in the world, But all of it can quickly disappear if the most powerful engine of this growth feels short-changed—and that engine is the customer.

All it would take is a few quarters for Apple’s castle to come crashing down. It will happen if the customer—who is king—realises, what a “Charlie” Apple is making out of them.

Microsoft strategically and conveniently allowed piracy of Windows in all second and third world countries for the longest period of time but captured a significant market share. The only sustainable ecosystem of programs and software across the planet is aligned to Windows. The world today is reluctant to switch off from Windows even if there are better and cheaper alternatives available. Apple seems to be losing this plot somehow.

Forget the profits and the success and the iconic status of Apple as a company—with just 20% market share at five-six times the price of similar products, all it would take is a few quarters for this castle to come crashing down. It will happen if the customer—who is king—realises, what a “Charlie” Apple is making out of them.

WhatsApp wouldn’t have existed today if BlackBerry had opened its

 

BlackBerry launches new Aurora smartphone – but here’s why you can’t get it

 

This is BlackBerry’s next phone – but you might not be able to get your hands on it
BlackBerry is back with its next smartphone release.Following the hype that surrounded the launch of the BlackBerry KEYOne at Mobile World Congress last month, the company has now revealed another new device.

The BlackBerry Aurora is the company’s first release in partnership with Indonesian firm BB Merah Putih, and looks to offer another affordable Android smartphone.

However for anyone based in the UK, getting the BlackBerry Aurora might not be as easy as expected.

At first glance, the BlackBerry Aurora looks like a fairly decent mid-range Android device.The device comes with a 5.5-inch 720p display, and runs Android 7.0 Nougat out of the box alongside BlackBerry’s own software offerings, including the DTEK security suite and BlackBerry Hub.

Inside, there’s a Snapdragon 425, 4GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, a microSD slot up to 2TB, and a 3,000 mAh battery that the company says will provide over 20 hours of battery life.

blackberry aurora android 7.0 nougat releaseBLACKBERRY

The BlackBerry Aurora combines Android 7.0 Nougat with some interesting hardware

The phone is also available in black, silver, and gold, and will go on sale for around $260 – or Indonesian RP 3,499,000.That’s because the BlackBerry Aurora will initially only go on sale in Indonesia.

The move is due to Indonesia actually boasting the world’s largest population of BlackBerry users.

There’s no news on a wider launch for the device just yet, but if the device proves a success we may yet see the BlackBerry Aurora in other markets at some point.BlackBerry is gearing up to launch its latest smartphone - here's everything we know so far about the new BlackBerry Mercury

If you’re still keen to get a new BlackBerry handset, the company is still gearing up to launch its KEYOne device soon.Blending classic BlackBerry design with new influences, the KEYOne retains BlackBerry’s iconic physical QWERTY keyboard, which has been given a major intelligence upgrade, with a stunning touchscreen display and metal body.

Inside, there’s a Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 processor, with the device powered by a huge 3505mAh battery enhanced by Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 abilities that will allow the phone to go from flat to 50 per cent charge in just 36 minutes.

The BlackBerry KEYOne will cost £499 SIM-free. In the US, it’ll set you back $549, and in Europe, it’ll cost €599.

BlackBerry hasn’t confirmed an exact date in April for the launch just yet, so you’ve still got a few weeks to save up your pennies for the new device.

 

The new hello button on Facebook is causing a lot of embarrassment- and here’s why

FACEBOOK has quietly introduced a brand new hello button so people can give each other a virtual wave.

But it seems the brand-new feature has been causing endless embarrassment, with users complaining they’ve accidentally sent a hello to people they aren’t friends with, or even worse – ex-partners.

 Facebook quietly introduced the new hello button on the site earlier this month

FACEBOOK
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Facebook quietly introduced the new hello button on the site earlier this month

Earlier this month, the new button started appearing at the top of people’s profiles on the social media site – right next to where you would click to send a friend request.

It is believed that Facebook bosses say it is a casual way of introducing yourself to someone and if they say hello back, it then gives you the option to form an online friendship.

But with many people using the social network to check up on their ex-partners, snoop on their boss or check out their crushes, many have hit the hello button by accident.

This in turn means that the person they have been online stalking knows that there have been people searching their profile.

And taking to Twitter, many have complained how the new features has left them cringing with embarrassment.

One revealed: “I was stalking my managers Facebook whilst I was at work and accidentally sent a “hello”, wow never wanted to die so much in my life.”

Emily added: “The amount of times I’ve accidentally hit the hello button on facebook is a joke, looking proper eager to people I’m not even friends with.”

Another person tweeted: “Trying to add people on Facebook and hitting the say hello button noooooooo I am not waving at u, mortified.”

While Amy wrote: “Why has Facebook made a “hello” button look like an absolute creep when I’m trying to add someone.”

However, Facebook fanatics have discovered a way to take back your hello, before the person sees it.

All you have to do is click the hello button again and it gives you the chance to take back the online greeting.

 

Why travel hasn’t solved its mobile problem

 

It seems as if every year since 2010 has been proclaimed as the “year of mobile” for brands across the spectrum. But this year, more than ever, having a mobile strategy for your ad spend has evolved from nice to have to being a necessity.

This need is driven by consumer adoption of smartphones. On average, consumers spend 1 hour and 40 minutes a day on their mobile devices, which is 60% more time than in 2015. After all this time, 2017 has been hailed as the year when mobile “grows up.”

As with most things, the challenge to growing up comes in transforming these thought-leadership pieces and attitudes into everyday action. That is, while the consensus is to ensure that your advertising efforts are mobile-friendly, when it comes to actualizing that idea, adoption seems to be slow.

Sojern’s recent collaborative report with Google reveals travel’s struggle to capture mobile consumers. Our report looked at the entire path to booking a hotel room, from the search engine to the booking engine. We saw that when it comes to hotel searches, the lower end enjoys the highest percentage with 73% of all searches for economy hotels being done through mobile devices.

On the other end of the spectrum, 45% of all searches for luxury hotels are on mobile devices. For the rest of the hotel segments — midscale, upper midscale, upscale and upper upscale — roughly half of searches are on mobile devices.

Although luxury hotels see the lowest share of mobile searches, this doesn’t mean they can avoid having a solid mobile strategy. In fact, we see that the luxury segment is experiencing the greatest growth in mobile searches world.

WhileWhile the searches are there, they aren’t necessarily translating into bookings.

When we look at mobile searches across a week, for example, we see that they are fairly evenly spread among the days of the workweek (Monday through Friday). On the weekends, mobile searches boom as people move away from their desktops at work and go out into the

searches soar, the same cannot be said for bookings. In fact, mobile bookings are consistently low throughout the week. Mobile is, then, the device for dreaming but it has yet to become the device for booking.

Why is that? Why are people booking hotels so reluctant to use mobile devices all the way through to their purchase?

We see two challenges. First, people often search via mobile but then convert on desktop once they are back at work and have further considered the decision; and second, they tried to book via mobile, but the experience was subpar, driving them to a desktop or to a competitor.

A large part of the problem is that running a strong mobile strategy only works if you think about the whole funnel, or the whole path to purchase. Your ability to identify and serve ads to an in-market traveler on their mobile device is certainly no easy feat. But if you’re spending on the tech and/or mobile media to drive people to websites with purchase paths that aren’t mobile-friendly, you don’t have a full-funnel mobile strategy.

Travel, in particular, faces a challenge in terms of creating a friction-free mobile experience.

Shopping for shoes, for example, only requires so many clicks and swipes. The right color, brand and size, and you’ve got your purchase. When it comes to a hotel room, you have to select your days, your room type, any add-ons or packages, add family members or additional rooms and then check to make sure that’s the room, at the location, on the date you need it.

If you want to start comparison shopping, doing so on mobile becomes a real challenge.

We’ve talked before about the complexity of the traveler’s path to purchase, and right now the mobile experience is faltering when it comes to the booking stage. More than ever, and more than most, travel marketers need to seriously re-evaluate their mobile experience. Creating a mobile strategy that ignores the user experience at the point of purchase is just creating a leaky pipeline.

Maybe, instead of making this the year that mobile grows up, we should work to make it the year that mobile converts.

 

Why BlackBerry (BBRY) Isn’t Done Growing Earnings Yet

 

Growth stocks can be some of the most exciting picks in the market, as these high-flyers can captivate investors’ attention, and produce big gains as well. However, these can also lead on the downside when the growth story is over, so it is important to find companies which are still seeing strong growth prospects in their businesses.

One such company that might be well-positioned for future earnings growth is BlackBerry Limited BBRY . This firm, which is in the Wireless Non-US industry, saw EPS growth of 92% last year, and is looking great for this year too.

In fact, the current growth estimate for this year calls for earnings-per-share growth of 38%. Furthermore, the long-term growth rate is currently an impressive 19%, suggesting pretty good prospects for the long haul.

BlackBerry Limited Price and Consensus

BlackBerry Limited Price and Consensus | BlackBerry Limited Quote

And if this wasn’t enough, the stock has actually seen estimates rise over the past month for the current fiscal year by about 20%. Thanks to this rise in earnings estimates, BBRY has a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) which further underscores the potential for outperformance in this company. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here .

So if you are looking for a fast growing stock that is still seeing plenty of opportunities on the horizon, make sure to consider BBRY. Not only does it have double digit earnings growth prospect, but its impressive Zacks Rank suggests that analysts believe better days are ahead for BBRY as well.

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