Over 100 Android Apps on Google Play Found to Be Infected With Windows Malware

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 132 apps were found infected with malware
  • The security firm traced the infected apps to a common location
  • Malware were downloaded from domains that have been disabled

Android has been known to suffer malware attacks from time to time. Just recently in December, it was reported that a malware called ‘Gooligan’ breached accounts of more than a million users. Now, a bizarre new type of malware has been detected in around 132 apps in Google Play that had the ability to affect Windows users, according to a security firm.

Palo Alto Networks discovered the malware-ridden apps and reported them to Google to have them removed from Google Play. The Internet security team in a blog post said that the apps, which were developed by several different people, managed to hide HTML-based iframe tags. The iframe tags, which are generally used to embed external elements in a webpage, like a YouTube video, was also loading elements from malicious domains. In one case, an app didn’t use iframe but Microsoft’s Visual Basic language to load malicious code into the app.

In the report, Palo Alto Networks traces the infected apps to a common geographical location even though the developers are unrelated. Most of the apps are said to originate from Indonesia, since the country’s name was attached to the names of the apps.Over 100 Android Apps on Google Play Found to Be Infected With Windows Malware

“One common way HTML files have been infected with malicious iframes has been through file infecting viruses like Ramnit. After infecting a Windows host, these viruses search the hard drive for HTML files and append iframes to each document. If a developer was infected with one of these viruses, their app’s HTML files could be infected,” the report notes.

The reports goes on to suggest that the malicious nature of the apps was not intentional and that the developers simply did not realise that their apps’ HTML files were infected when uploading their apps to Google Play. Furthermore, the purpose of the malware was to load interstitial ads and the main malicious applications, elaborates Ars Technica.

These Windows-specific malware were downloaded from domains that have long since been disabled. So while the apps themselves aren’t a threat on Android devices, it still raises concerns on Google’s app screening process, and why it failed to identify the infected apps.

Motorola Moto Z2 Play

 

Motorola Moto Z2 Play smartphone was launched in June 2017. The phone comes with a 5.50-inch touchscreen display with a resolution of 1080 pixels by 1920 pixels at a PPI of 401 pixels per inch.

The Motorola Moto Z2 Play is powered by 2.2GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 processor and it comes with 3GB of RAM. The phone packs 32GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 2000GB via a microSD card. As far as the cameras are concerned, the Motorola Moto Z2 Play packs a 12-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 5-megapixel front shooter for selfies.

The Motorola Moto Z2 Play runs Android 7.1.1 and is powered by a 3000mAh non removable battery. It measures 156.20 x 76.20 x 5.99 (height x width x thickness) and weigh 145.00 grams.

The Motorola Moto Z2 Play is a single SIM (GSM) smartphone that accepts a Nano-SIM. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth, NFC, FM, 3G and 4G (with support for Band 40 used by some LTE networks in India). Sensors on the phone include Compass Magnetometer, Proximity sensor, Accelerometer, Ambient light sensor and Gyroscope.Moto Z2 Play

About Motorola

Motorola Mobility was established in 2011 following the split of Motorola into two companies, with Motorola Solutions catering to the enterprise segment. Acquired soon after by Google, Motorola Mobility was sold to Lenovo in 2014. Motorola made its first Android smartphone in 2009, and its first Android tablet in 2011.
Motorola Moto Z2 Play

Motorola Moto Z2 Play

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

2.2GHz octa-core

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

1080×1920 pixels

RAM

3GB

OS

Android 7.1.1

Storage

32GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3000mAh

Also See
  • Motorola Moto E
    Rs. 5,681
  • Motorola Moto E (Gen 2) (White, 8GB)
    Rs. 6,499
  • Motorola Moto E (Gen 2) (White, 8GB)
    Rs. 6,499
Compare With :

 

Motorola Moto Z2 Play detailed specifications
GENERAL
Release date June 2017
Form factor Touchscreen
Dimensions (mm) 156.20 x 76.20 x 5.99
Weight (g) 145.00
Battery capacity (mAh) 3000
Removable battery No
Colours Lunar Grey, Fine Gold
SAR value NA
DISPLAY
Screen size (inches) 5.50
Touchscreen Yes
Resolution 1080×1920 pixels
Pixels per inch (PPI) 401
HARDWARE
Processor 2.2GHz octa-core
Processor make Qualcomm Snapdragon 626
RAM 3GB
Internal storage 32GB
Expandable storage Yes
Expandable storage type microSD
Expandable storage up to (GB) 2000
CAMERA
Rear camera 12-megapixel
Flash Yes
Front camera 5-megapixel
SOFTWARE
Operating System Android 7.1.1
CONNECTIVITY
Wi-Fi Yes
Wi-Fi standards supported 802.11 a/b/g/n
GPS Yes
Bluetooth Yes, v 4.20
NFC Yes
Infrared No
USB OTG No
Headphones 3.5mm
FM Yes
Number of SIMs 1
SIM 1
SIM Type Nano-SIM
GSM/CDMA GSM
3G Yes
4G/ LTE Yes
Supports 4G in India (Band 40) Yes
SENSORS
Compass/ Magnetometer Yes
Proximity sensor Yes
Accelerometer Yes
Ambient light sensor Yes
Gyroscope Yes
Barometer No
Temperature sensor No
Error or missing information? Please let us know

More Android apps from dangerous Ztorg family sneak into Google Play

 

For the second time this month, Google has removed Android apps from its Google Play marketplace. Google did so after a security researcher found the apps contained code that laid the groundwork for attackers to take administrative “root” control of infected devices.

“Magic Browser,” as one app was called, was uploaded to Google’s official Android App bazaar on May 15 and gained more than 50,000 downloads by the time it was removed, Kaspersky Lab Senior Research Analyst Roman Unuchek said in a blog post published Tuesday. Magic Browser was disguised as a knock-off to the Chrome browser. The other app, “Noise Detector,” purported to measure the decibel level of sounds, and it had been downloaded more than 10,000 times. Both apps belong to a family of Android malware known as Ztorg, which has managed to sneak past Google’s automated malware checks almost 100 times since last September.

Most Ztorg apps are notable for their ability to use well-known exploits to root infected phones. This status allows the apps to have finer-grain control and makes them harder to be removed. Ztorg apps are also concerning for their large number of downloads. A Ztorg app known as Privacy Lock, for instance, received one million installations before Google removed it last month, while an infected Pokémon Go guide racked up 500,000 downloads before its removal in September.

Earlier this month, Google removed a game called colourblock after Kaspersky Lab’s Unuchek found it contained code dubbed DVmap that attempted to gain root. To evade detection by Google, DVmap developers initially uploaded a clean version of the game to Play and later updated it to add malicious functions. Unuchek has warned that the rooting processes used by malicious rooting apps can often harm the phones because the apps can overwrite crucial files and folders.

Magic Browser and Noise Detector didn’t actually root the phones, but the Ztorg digital fingerprints in both apps led Unuchek to theorize that the app developers were in the process of adding the capability to one or both of the apps gradually in an attempt to evade detection. In the meantime, the researcher said, the developers were using Magic Browser to either test or actively use malicious text-messaging functions. The app had the ability to send premium text messages to attacker-controlled numbers. To keep users in the dark, the app could also delete incoming texts and turn off the device sound.

“So I think that the authors are still testing this malware, because they use some techniques which can break the infected devices,” Unuchek wrote. “But they already have a lot of infected users on whom to test their methods. I hope that by uncovering this malware at such an early stage, we will be able to prevent a massive and dangerous attack when the attackers are ready to actively use their methods.”

E3 2017: Sony’s PlayLink for PS4 Will Let You Play Games Using Your Phone

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • PlayLink lets you play games on your PS4 via a smartphone
  • Titles vary from crime thrillers to quick-fire quizzes
  • PlayLink titles include That’s You!, Hidden Agenda

At the ongoing E3 2017 in Los Angeles, California, Sony announced some of its most anticipated games for PlayStation for the year including God of War, Spider-Man and Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, to name a few. Console titles aside, the company also introduced PlayLink, which allows users to play games with family and friends using their smartphones and tablets.

PlayLink is aimed at creating a fun, interactive way to play games in a social setting. Based on a video Sony released showcasing the feature, PlayLink requires a smartphone or tablet, a TV, and a PlayStation 4 console, which, when set up, lets you and your group of family or friends play interactive PlayLink titles.

“PlayLink games turn your smartphone or tablet into a versatile controller – you can swipe, pinch, drag, tilt, rotate or even snap selfies and draw crafty doodles, depending on the game. No matter which title you choose from our PlayLink collection, it’s guaranteed to be a slick pick-up-and-play experience,” Sony said in a blog post.E3 2017: Sony's PlayLink for PS4 Will Let You Play Games Using Your Phone

PlayLink titles range from crime thrillers to quick-fire quizzes. In one of the videos, for example, you see a group of people playing That’s You! – a quiz-based app that “challenges you and up to five friends to get personal and find out what you really think about each other.” This will be one of the first titles for PlayLink and will be available for PlayStation Plus members for free starting July 4.

Another video shows a crime and narrative-based game called Hidden Agenda that allows up to six people to join in. The game requires the players to make tough, quick decisions as the story progresses, which will also influence the way the game moves forward.

Sony sees PlayLink as something that can come in handy during social gatherings as well as rope in new players to video games. It also reminds one of Jackbox Games’ Party Pack multi-platform social games. Some other PlayLink titles that can be expected soon include Knowledge is Power, Frantic, and SingStar Celebration.

 

Google Play Music’s New Feature for Samsung Galaxy S8 Isn’t That Exclusive

 

HIGHLIGHTS
New Google Play Music feature now rolling out
Samsung Galaxy S8 users getting the New Release Radio station
Some users able to use the new feature on non-Samsung devices
For Samsung Galaxy S8 users, Google Play Music is the default music player and streaming service. Now, Galaxy S8 users are receiving a brand new feature dubbed New Release Radio, which is a personalised radio station with new music releases and updates on a daily basis.

The latest New Release Radio feature has steadily been popping up on Galaxy S8 devices with “Samsung Exclusive” tagline. The pop-up describes the new feature, “Listen to brand new music, personalised to your tastes and listening history – with new recommendations every day.” The feature was first spotted by a Reddit user, and was reported by Sammobile.Google Play Music's New Feature for Samsung Galaxy S8 Isn't That Exclusive

Engadget, however, points out that the feature may not be limited to Samsung Galaxy S8 users as some users have been able to add the “New Release Radio” station to their libraries. Some Reddit users also claim that they were able to add the new feature to their libraries while using Google Play Music Web interface as well as on non-Samsung devices. Unfortunately, there’s no word whether the feature will be kept as an exclusive for Samsung Galaxy S8 (and Galaxy S8+) devices or to be made available to all users in the long run.
We can expect an update on the status of availability of the “New Release Radio” station for non-Samsung devices.

Samsung and Google jointly announced their new partnership back in April, and it gave some benefits to Samsung users. They were allowed to upload 100,000 of their own songs to Google Play Music for free, which is almost double the limit for owners of non-Samsung devices.

 

Google Play Hit by More Ztorg-Based Android Malware, Says Kaspersky Labs

 

HIGHLIGHTS
Google has removed Magic Browser and Noise Detector apps
These apps belonged to the Ztorg Trojan family of Android malwares
Kaspersky researcher spotted these apps and their attack course
In a bid to increase security on its Android platform, Google has reportedly removed more Android apps from its Google Play store for the second time this month. Google has taken strict action against two malicious apps – Magic Browser and Noise Detector – acting as conduits for attackers to remotely ‘root’ control the infected devices after a researcher from Kaspersky Lab pointed out the threat in his report. The Android malware carried by these apps belongs to the Ztorg Trojan family, which is notoriously known for bypassing Google’s safety controls to root infected Android devices.

In a report published on Kaspersky Lab’s Securelist website, senior researcher Roman Unuchek presents extensive analysis on the new Ztorg-based malware. Kaspersky Lab says Ztorg malware bypassed Google’s malware checks almost 100 times since September last year, and the malware family is best known for gaining ‘root’ privileges of infected devices to completely control them. Ztorg apps like Privacy Lock and a false Pokemon Go guide raked in huge download numbers before they were recognised as malicious and deleted from Google Play.Google Play Hit by More Ztorg-Based Android Malware, Says Kaspersky Labs

Coming to the current batch of apps, the first one is Magic Browser that pretended to be a Chrome browser alternative in Google Play. It was published on May 15 and had been downloaded over 50,000 times before it was finally removed. The other app is Noise Detector that was meant to allow users to measure the decibel level of sounds and had more than 10,000 downloads before its removal.
Both the apps, as we mentioned, belonged to the Ztorg Trojan family, but didn’t root affected devices before their removal. Unuchek says the app had the Ztorg digital fingerprint, and speculates that the developers may soon have added the root ability if the apps hadn’t been removed.

Unuchek says the Magic Browser app was being used by developers to either test or use malicious text messaging functions. The Magic Browser could send premium text messages to infected phone numbers and leave no traces behind by even deleting the incoming messages and muting the notification sound. “In total, the Magic browser app tries to send SMS from 11 different places in its code. Cybercriminals are doing this in order to be able to send SMS from different Android versions and devices. Furthermore, I was able to find another modification of the Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.Ztorg that is trying to send an SMS via the “am” command, although this approach should not work,” reads Unuchek’s report.

 

How to play PC games on your smartphone?

 

PC games are more resource intensive and take up more space.

Cross-platform gaming is still in a nascent stage. Most attempts at it have been unsuccessful. The few options include the Bluetsacks emulator, which allows Android games on PCs, and Sony’s Play Station Now platform, which can run PS3 games on a Windows PC.

But getting a PC game to run on a smartphone is a different ball game, as PC games are more resource intensive and take up more space.

Cloud gaming companies such as OnLive have tried and failed at it. Now a New York, US-based gaming company LiquidSky has come with a cloud-based app which can run any PC game on your smartphone and surprisingly you don’t need a OnePlus 5-like device to run it.

The minimum system requirement for the smartphone is just 1GB RAM and 30MB of storage. The games will be downloaded on cloud, so you don’t have to worry about the storage on your smartphone at all.

LiquidSky recommends wired controllers for the best gaming experience.LiquidSky recommends wired controllers for the best gaming experience.

Needs steady internet connection

However, it requires an active internet connection with minimum bandwidth speed of 5Mbps and recommended speed of up to 20Mbps for the best gaming experience. Online gaming is not new to the mobile ecosystem. Many Android games require active internet connection to work, however getting the 20Mbps mark consistently is going to be a challenge, especially on mobile networks in India. This makes it heavily dependent on WiFi networks.

How does it work?

Liquid Sky works by connecting smartphones to a virtual PC running on cloud. The actual game will be downloaded and run on a remote server, which will then compress and stream the game on users’ smartphone at frame rate of 60fps.

LiquidSky is available only for Android devices right now.LiquidSky is available only for Android devices right now.

Once users sign up in the app, and take a subscription plan, they can browse and download any games from their existing library of purchased games or buy new ones on Steam, GOG, Origin, Blizzard or Humble Bumble. These are online stores for PC games and their API (application programme interface) is built into the app, so one doesn’t have to download their apps separately.

How much does it cost?

LiquidSky is available only for Android devices right now and can be downloaded from the Google Play Store (there is no news on the iOS app yet). Users in India can download it for free but to access the games, one of the subscriptions is required. Basic Pay-as-you-go plan starts at $9.99 (approximately Rs644) and provides 100GB of storage.

The monthly subscription, which offers 500GB of cloud storage and the option to change data centres, starts at $19.99 (approximately Rs1,289) per month. There is a free model too, with in-app advertisements and 100GB storage, but its only available to users in the US and Canada.PC games are more resource intensive and take up more space.

How is it different?

LiquidSky uses IBM’s public cloud infrastructure which is more robust, easy to scale and has got data centres spread across the globe. One of the reasons for the failure of services such as OnLive was that it used its own servers to host the games and was unable to put up with the cost. Also, they failed to acquire top-tier games form leading game developers such as EA Sports and Activision.

The biggest highlight of Liquid Sky is that you can purchase, download and play any PC game that is available on one of the linked game stores.

Why do you need controllers?

Technically. PC games are not designed for touchscreen devices. You need a controller or a mouse and keyboard to play them. Smartphone users won’t be able to run them through on-screen controls and will require a compatible Android controller, which can be connected to the phone with an OTG cable or wirelessly over Bluetooth. LiquidSky recommends wired controllers for the best gaming experience.

 

Samsung Makes Google Play Music the Default Music App and Service on Its Devices

 

Samsung and Google have jointly announced a new partnership that will make Google Play Music the default music player and streaming service on Samsung mobiles and tablets. The announcements coincides with the global retail launch of the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+, Samsung’s latest flagship smartphones.

The deal also benefits Samsung users as they’ll be able to upload 100,000 of their own songs to Google Play Music for free, double the limit for owners of non-Samsung devices. Additionally, new Samsung phones and tablets will come with a free three-month trial of Google Play Music. Post the trial period, those who plan to subscribe for it will get over 40 million songs on-demand and access to YouTube Red (where available), just like other subscribers of the service.

Google in November launched a revamped Play Music service that is powered by Google’s machine learning and contextual tools. Machine learning allows the service to understand the music the user likes based on location, time, weather, and activity, to name a few.

Google’s Play Music service competes against the likes of Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora Premium, and others. The tie up with Samsung, one of the leading smartphone manufactures in the world, will help Google expand its reach and give it the right amount of boost it needs to take on other streaming giants.Samsung Makes Google Play Music the Default Music App and Service on Its Devices

Having Google Play Music as a default music player means Samsung will not have to worry about dedicating resources towards developing its own music player, though it’s still available to download from Google Play Store. Samsung has tried in the past to get into the music streaming game with Milk Music, but its attempt at competing against Spotify and Apple failed, and the company in August decided to kill off the service.

Interestingly, Google’s Play Music service will support Samsung’s own personal assistant software, Bixby. Users will be able to ask Bixby to look up a song and play it similar to how it works with Apple’s Siri. The Bixby support will kick in once the digital assistant comes out later this spring for Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+.

Samsung’s latest flagship Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ will go on sale in India from May 5.

 

Moto Z2 Play Tipped to Sport Smaller Battery; Moto ‘Productivity’ Tablet Rumoured

 

If you remember Moto Z Play smartphone from last year, you will remember that its thickness was never pointed out as a flaw by critics as the device’s thickness was slightly more than some of other phones by the company to accommodate a large battery capacity of 3510mAh. As per a new leak, Lenovo has decided to go ahead with reduced battery life on Moto Z2 Play to cut down on thickness of the smartphone. Separately, the company has been tipped to be working a Moto Android tablet for the first time in many years.

As per the leaked details of Moto Z2 Play smartphone, shared by Venture Beat, Lenovo’s upcoming smartphone will feature a 3000mAh battery, downgraded from its predecessor’s 3510mAh, which will result in a drop of maximum listed usage time from 50 hours to 30 hours. While the exact thickness of the smartphone has not been leaked yet, VB suggests that the upcoming phone’s thickness will be close to matching Moto Z’s thickness (5.19mm).

The Moto Z2 Play leaked details suggest that the phone will run Android 7.1.1 Nougat out-of-the-box and sport the same 5.5-inch full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) Super AMOLED display as its previous generation. However, the phone is expected to see an upgrade in internals as it has been tipped to be powered by a 2.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 processor coupled with 4GB of RAM and Adreno 506 GPU. The Moto Z2 Play is expected to come with 64GB of built-in storage.Moto Z2 Play Tipped to Sport Smaller Battery; Moto 'Productivity' Tablet Rumoured

In terms of optics, the upcoming Moto Z2 Play is expected to come with same 5-megapixel front-facing camera as its predecessor but Moto is expected to reduce the resolution of the main camera to achieve increased imaging quality, as per the report. This is why the Moto Z2 Play has been tipped to come with a 12-megapixel primary rear camera with f/1.7 aperture, featuring dual autofocus pixels, compared with the 16-megapixel sensor with f/2.0 aperture on the Moto Z Play. The Moto Z2 Play is expected to be made available in Lunar Grey and Fine Gold colours.

Moving to the Android tablet by Moto, Lenovo has been tipped to be working on a tablet with screen size of around 9 to 10 inches, as per a report by Android Police. While there aren’t any specific details shared about device, it is expected to come with “productivity mode”, which is similar to a multitasking feature on Lenovo’s Yoga Book. Productivity mode essentially allows users to pin apps to the navbar and easily move between them without having to use multitask UI or go back to the homescreen, as pointed out in the report.

 

Moto Z2 Play First Impressions

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Moto Z2 Play is priced at Rs 27,999
  • It is powered by a Snapdragon 626 processor and has 4GB of RAM
  • All existing Moto Mods are compatible with the new Z2 Play

Lenovo-owned Motorola recently launched the Moto Z2 Play in India. The phone it replaces, the Moto Z Play (Review), was quite popular for offering brilliant battery life and good performance. Priced at Rs 27,999 the new Moto Z2 Play improves on the hardware of its predecessor and gets a sleeker design, but most importantly, it supports all Moto Mods made till date. We got to spend some time with the new Moto Z2 Play at its launch, and here are our first impressions of the device.

Moto Z2 Play design

The design of the Moto Z2 Play is quite similar to that of the Z Play, and this has a lot to do with the Moto Mods ecosystem. To ensure that the Mods launched last year are compatible with the new phone, Moto had to retain the same height and width, with the connector pins in the same location. The only way this phone could change was its thickness, and Motorola has gone ahead and done exactly that by shaving a millimeter off it. The original Moto Z Play was 6.99 mm thick while the Moto Z2 Play is slimmer at 5.99mm. This has resulted in a hit to the battery capacity, which is now down from 3510mAh to 3000mAh. On the other hand, one positive effect is that the new phone weighs 145g, 20g less than the Z Play.

Moto Z2 Play Front NDTV Moto Z2 Play

The front of the Moto Z2 Play sports a 5.5-inch Super Amoled display with a resolution of 1080×1920 pixels and Corning Gorilla Glass for protection. It’s vivid, and the viewing angles are quite good. Sunlight legibility could be an issue as we found ourselves hunting for the brightness control when outdoors. Below the screen is a fingerprint sensor, which Moto says has been elongated on the sides to allow better detection of gestures.

Moto Actions give users an alternative to the traditional three-button Android navigation scheme, in the form of gestures using the fingerprint sensor. This frees up some space on the screen for more content. You can swipe left on the fingerprint sensor to go back, swipe right to pull up the app switcher, and tap to go to the homescreen. You also have the option to long-press the fingerprint sensor to lock the phone. The learning curve is not as steep as we initially thought it would be, and we got used to this method fairly quickly.

To keep selfie lovers happy, the Moto Z2 Play has a 5-megapixel front camera with a dual-tone LED flash. There is a beautification mode which can help selfies look better. It looks like the Moto Z2 Play misses out on a notification LED, as we couldn’t find one. At the back, towards the bottom, there are multiple rows of contact points for the phone to interface with Mods. In the center of the top is the same large camera bump that we have seen in the rest of the Moto Z series, again because of the mods. The 12-megapixel primary camera’s sensor has 1.4-micron pixels, and there’s a dual-tone LED flash here as well. The lens has an f/1.7 aperture which should help capture better images in low light. Photos seemed to look quite good, but we’ll reserve our comments until we test the Moto Z2 Play thoroughly.

Moto Z2 Play Camera NDTV Moto Z2 Play First Impressions

The camera bump has a metal ring around it that keeps the lens from getting scratched when the phone is placed on a surface. Moto will also ship a Mod Shell with the Moto Z2 Play which adds bulk, but also makes the bump feel much less prominent.

The frame of the Moto Z2 Play is aluminium, which gives it a premium look. What’s interesting is that Moto has designed the antenna lines around the body of the phone, which is a unique and functional touch. The power and volume buttons are on the right, while at the top there is a SIM tray which can house two Nano-SIMs as well as a dedicated slot for a microSD card. The Z2 Play only has a USB Type-C port at the bottom, and the earpiece doubles up as the loudspeaker.

Moto Z2 Play specifications

The biggest change in the Moto Z2 Play, compared to its predecessor, is under the hood. Powering the phone is a Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 octa-core processor clocked at 2.2GHz, which is an updated version of the Snapdragon 625. There is 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage, which you can expand. In terms of software, the Z2 Play runs pretty much stock Android Nougat. Moto has only preloaded a set of Google apps which don’t get in the way at all.

Moto Z2 Play Nougat NDTV Moto Z2 Play First Impressions

In our very limited time with this phone, we enjoyed using the Moto Z2 Play. The fingerprint scanner is accurate and is quick to unlock the phone. There was no stutter or lag when multitasking. We’re also happy to note that quick charging is supported, and there’s a 15W turbo charger in the box.

It looks like the Moto Z2 Play is on the same track as the phone it replaces. The internals have gotten better but so has the competition. The Samsung Galaxy C7 Pro (Review) is the closest match to the Z2 Play, and although it does not offer modularity like the Moto Z2 Play, it has a lower asking price. Stay tuned to Gadgets 360 for our full review of the Moto Z2 Play.

Disclosure: Lenovo sponsored the correspondent’s flights and hotel for the event in Goa.

Motorola Moto Z2 Play

Motorola Moto Z2 Play

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

2.2GHz octa-core

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

1080×1920 pixels

RAM

3GB

OS

Android 7.1.1

Storage

32GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3000mAh

Also See
  • Moto Z2 Play (Lunar Gray and Black, 64GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs. 27,999
  • Moto Z2 Play (Fine Gold and White, 64GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs. 27,999

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